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Member Profile: sak2013 (1102 posts)

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Hello, I'm sak2013 (report this user)
I am from Canada
I last logged in on 03 Dec 2015
I have been a member since 29 May 2013
I have added 1102 posts in trackitt forums
I added my last post on 03 Dec 2015
sak2013's Immigration Cases
 
I-485 case: Approved in 301 days (363 days less than average)   (0 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Country of Chargeability:CanadaApplicant Type:primary
Service Center:TexasCategory:EB3
Priority Date:07 Feb 2013Application Filed:23 Jan 2015
USCIS Received Date:26 Jan 2015USCIS Notice Date:
USCIS Receipt Number:SRC**********I-140/485 Filing:non-concurrent
I-140 Processing Type:regularI-140 Approval Date:30 Mar 2015
First Fingerprint Date:27 Feb 2015Second Fingerprint Date:
RFE Received?:RFE Received Date:
Reason for RFE:RFE Replied Date:
Case Transferred to:Field OfficeTransfer Date:29 Apr 2015
Name Check Status:Name Check Approval Date:
I-485 Status:approvedI-485 Approval/Denial Date:20 Nov 2015
Card Production Ordered:20 Nov 2015Card Received Date:27 Nov 2015
EAD Applied?:yesAP Applied?:yes
EAD Approval Date:02 Apr 2015AP Approval Date:02 Apr 2015
EAD Received:09 Apr 2015AP Received:09 Apr 2015
Time to Get EAD Approval:69 daysTime to Get AP Approval:69 days
Time to Get Fingerprinting Done:35 daysTotal Time to Get GC:301 days
Most Recent LUD:Days Elapsed:
Experience:
Case Added to Tracker: 06 Feb 2015 Last Updated: 28 Nov 2015
Notes:

I-140 case: Approved in 209 days (35 days more than average)   (0 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Applicant Type:primaryService Center:Texas
Category:EB3Priority Date:07 Feb 2013
Application Filed:02 Sep 2014USCIS Received Date:04 Sep 2014
USCIS Notice Date:12 Sep 2014USCIS Receipt Number:SRC**********
I-140/485 Filing:non-concurrentProcessing Type:regular
RFE Received?:RFE Received Date:
Reason for RFE:RFE Replied Date:
Application Status:approvedApproval/Denial Date:30 Mar 2015
Total Processing Time:209 daysMost Recent LUD:
Days Elapsed:
Case Added to Tracker: 15 Sep 2014 Last Updated: 31 Mar 2015
Notes: Approved after a long 7-month wait...

I-765 case: Approved in 69 days (0 days more than average)   (3 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Application Type:new applicationService Center:Texas
Filing Method:paper-basedApplication Filed:23 Jan 2015
USCIS Received Date:26 Jan 2015USCIS Notice Date:
USCIS Receipt Number:SRC**********RFE Received?:
RFE Received Date:Reason for RFE:
RFE Replied Date:Application Status:approved
Approval/Denial Date:02 Apr 2015Card Production Ordered:07 Apr 2015
EAD Received:09 Apr 2015Total Processing Time:69 days
Most Recent LUD:Days Elapsed:
Case Added to Tracker: 06 Feb 2015 Last Updated: 10 Apr 2015
Notes:

I-131 case: Approved in 69 days (9 days more than average)   (0 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Service Center:TexasUSCIS District Office:
Filing Method:paper-basedApplication Filed:23 Jan 2015
USCIS Received Date:26 Jan 2015USCIS Notice Date:
USCIS Receipt Number:SRC**********RFE Received?:
RFE Received Date:Reason for RFE:
RFE Replied Date:Application Status:approved
Approval/Denial Date:02 Apr 2015AP Received:09 Apr 2015
Total Processing Time:69 daysMost Recent LUD:
Days Elapsed:
Case Added to Tracker: 06 Feb 2015 Last Updated: 10 Apr 2015
Notes:

PERM case: Approved in 517 days (282 days more than average)   (9 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Priority Date:07 Feb 2013Category:EB3
Audit Received?:yesAudit Received Date:15 Aug 2013
Reason for Audit:Random AuditAudit Replied Date:06 Sep 2013
Application Status:approvedApproval/Denial Date:09 Jul 2014
Total Processing Time:517 daysDays Elapsed:
Case Added to Tracker: 18 Jun 2013 Last Updated: 10 Jul 2014
Notes: Finally, after waiting behind the seemingly endless audit month of Jan 2013, certified.

H-1B case: Approved in 60 days (34 days less than average)   (0 comments)
User: sak2013 Nationality: Canada
Application Type:extensionService Center:Vermont
Processing Type:regularApplication Filed:17 Apr 2014
USCIS Received Date:12 May 2014Receipt Number:EAC*****
RFE Received?:noRFE Received Date:
Reason for RFE:RFE Replied Date:
Application Status:approvedApproval/Denial Date:16 Jun 2014
TN Status:NoneMost Recent LUD:
Total Processing Time:60 daysDays Elapsed:
Case Added to Tracker: 10 Jul 2014 Last Updated: 02 Aug 2014
Notes: Extension approved based on pending PERM.
sak2013's Posts
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 03 Dec 2015
Topic: Is Visa Number available for ROW under EB3 now?

That is correct. EB3 ROW is, for all practical purposes, current. As long as your PD is prior to what it says in the bulletin, you are good to file your I-485. Keep in mind that there are small gaps (particularly around September/October timeframe) when they exhaust all of the immigrant visa numbers for the year. When that happens, there is a few week period where the final adjudication of all pending I-485 applications freezes until October 1st when the new quota opens up. That was what prevented them from approving my green card at my interview this year, they exhausted the numbers the morning of my interview. I had to wait a few weeks until after Oct 1 for the final approval/card production. Very minor inconvenience though relative to what our far less fortunate Indian and Chinese colleagues have to deal with.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 02 Dec 2015
Topic: My daughter's 485 was denied after I changed my job

If you left the company, you cannot get a legitimate employment letter and would have to disclose that you have switched companies. I would not recommend doing that under any circumstances. If they find out you were dishonest about your intent to continue working for the sponsoring employer after getting your green card, they are within their jurisdiction re-opening your I-485 case and taking away your permanent resident status. I would discuss this with a lawyer, but what they will tell you is that since you switched companies, you will have to file a new family-based case under F2A. With F2A, it is based entirely on your already-approved permanent residency and your relationship. You do not have to disclose anything about the company you work for, so it has much less risk of jeopardizing your own green card. You just need to demonstrate the relationship (birth certificate etc.), pay the filing fees, and do an interview. It would take 1-1.5 years assuming the dates progress somewhat linearly.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 02 Dec 2015
Topic: Traffic Ticket dismissed misdemeanor

If you were not arrested or booked, you answer no to this question. You are innocent until proven guilty in this country, and you never, EVER incriminate yourself in the USA or even speak to any government official about such incidents unless they have enough of a case to make an arrest, have read you your miranda rights, and you have a lawyer present. They WILL use anything you say or disclose against you, so always let your lawyers do the talking. If they did not prosecute, you are under no obligation to say anything about it, to anyone, as it is nothing more than an investigation. Police reports are never admissible as evidence in any legal venue, even civil. The funny thing is, they actually ask in the I-485 interviews "have you ever committed a crime for which you have not been charged?". I actually confronted mine and asked her "isn't that question a direct violation of one's Fifth Amendment rights since your basically asking them to incriminate themselves?". She hummed and hawed, and promptly moved on to the next question :)
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Posted in I-140 Forum on 28 Nov 2015
Topic: TN visa and immigrant intent

For TN-1 visa you just need your identity documents (passport etc.), the job offer from the US company (preferably on company letterhead w/phone number), and the originals of your educational credentials/degrees. Take that info w/the job offer to the port of entry, pay your $50 or whatever it is these days, crack a few jokes with the customs officer to get off on the right foot, and you're good. They'll give you 3-year TN-1. Extensions get a bit trickier though, after you renew at the border the second or third time they get cranky about it. Better to file subsequent extensions with USCIS via I-129. Once you get new approved I-94, it takes the discretion away from the customs officers and they can't deny you entry.

For green card, timing is key, because once you express immigrant intent they (even USCIS) will deny you any subsequent TN-1 renewals. Back when TN-1's were only good for 1 year at a time, I had several colleagues who ended up stuck in Canada for a period of time waiting for their green card because they were denied re-entry on TN-1. My employer switched me to H-1B before filing green card to avoid taking any chances, and I am now a permanent resident. If your employer is willing to flip you to H-1B, I would go that route. That way you are guaranteed to be able to keep extending your H-1B indefinitely until your green card is processed, and you can fall back to the H-1B in the event that your green card is denied. With TN-1, if your green card is denied, kiss your EAD goodbye and plan on spending a year in Canada.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 23 Nov 2015
Topic: Very good news eb2

Actually most of us from the rest of the world have never used a fake resume, nor would we ever even consider doing that. It is Indians en masse that use fake resumes all over the place that has led to the ridiculous scrutiny with the Labor Certification process. Simply put, nobody trusts you anymore.

On this side of the world, uttering a forged document with the intent to defraud is a crime. A person convicted of forgery can face heavy penalties including imprisonment, heavy fines, probation, and community service. Desi body shops do it all the time for their H-1B consultants, because if they get caught, they just throw the dime-a-dozen consultant under the bus, send them packing, and bring in another one. That is why most IT managers in the US shy away from such vendors now when hiring staff. When guys claiming to have 10-15 years of experience are walking into IT shops for expert/senior roles, but look like they are 25 year old kids, it doesn't take an intelligence analyst to figure out what is going on :)
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 16 Nov 2015
Topic: More Pain for H1 and L1 Visa holder

I wasn't attacking anybody personally, just stating my own observations from hiring H-1B candidates from vendors, and the general perceptions of US Citizens on this issue (my wife and most of my family being citizens). To give you an example, I hired one guy w/12 alleged years of experience on his resume, and found out later that he was 23 years old. Did he start working in IT at the age of 11? I hardly think so. I hired another guy, and somebody else showed up for the job with a different name that didn't know how to log in. From what I've heard from my Indian colleagues that used to work for body shops, that is commonplace and they have made a business out of it. Probably why most of the IT "experts" that come here from India now look like they're in their early 20's, they really are :)

It is undisputed that American IT workers are being displaced en masse from the H-1B program. While the government has been able to do little about it thus far due to the separation of powers, everybody is well aware of this abuse, even voters. So the AILA (most of whom profit from this body shopping as much as companies do) can lobby until they are blue in the face. The only legislation that will pass is that which has the greater support of U.S. Citizens. Since this legislation protects both American workers and companies alike, as well as the other non-fraudulent ROW immigrants that are thrown into a lottery because of this body shopping, I think it has a decent shot of prevailing.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 13 Nov 2015
Topic: More Pain for H1 and L1 Visa holder

H-1B is not strict at all from a process standpoint. If you have legitimate skills in high enough demand for a company to pay you a competitive rate, you're basically in. That is what allowed this body shopping to happen to begin with...way too much ambiguity and way too little verification of resumes, experience, credentials and documents, and way too little oversight into companies that routinely replace their entire IT staff with H-1B workers to the point where you think you just walked into Channai or Hyderabad when you walk into the IT floor. These big consulting companies exploited the hell out of this for decades. They actually have employees on staff, whose sole job description it is to basically create a false flag for their freshers and manufacture an identity with a complete fraudulent work history. They have others on hand whose sole job description it is to take proxy interviews. The fact that they even need such positions says it all. The legislature is just closing doors that should have never been opened to begin with, in the US Government's classic reactive vs. proactive manner.

Unless you have a PhD or an 8-figure bank account, or you're an actor/model or professional athlete, your not what US Citizens would call a "desirable immigrant", and there are 1000 US Citizens on unemployment that they can train just as easily as you to do your job. Be thankful that you were able to slip in those doors while they were still open.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 12 Nov 2015
Topic: Revised bill for h1b restrictions

All this will mean is that we will see a massive amount of fly-by-night Indian-only degree shops in the US under the guise of "colleges" that companies like CTS, Tata, etc. will start up to pump all of their freshers through in exchange for a 50% margin afterwards. The educational requirements need to be very, very specific and highly scrutinized for this to actually solve the problem.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 08 Nov 2015
Topic: EB2 PH I485 Interview Help!!

Has her I-485 been pending for more than 6 months, and did she utilize AC21 to port her AOS to the new employer?

Technically, you can adjust status without ever having worked for the petitioning employer of the I-140, as the employment-based I-485 applications are for future employment. However, what will be problematic in her case, and what they are going to go after her with in the interview, is the "intent" provisions:
- The old employer must have had a bona fide intent to offer her employment with the prevailing wage at the time the I-140 was approved, and she must have documentation to prove that. If they started withholding her pay and reducing her hours prior to her I-140 being approved, she'll be out of luck and they will likely revoke the I-140 and deny adjustment.
- Assuming she ported under AC21, and her old employer didn't stop paying her until her I-140 was approved, the new employer (hospital) has now assumed the legal burden of this intent to employ. The hospital must be willing to provide documentation that they can and will continue to indefinitely employ her upon the I-485 being approved.
- She must be able to demonstrate her own intent to actually work for the new employer full-time once the I-485 is approved, they will question her under oath.

Generally, people that have nothing to hide do not suffer from anxiety. So I get the impression there may be more to this story than you have described above. If that is the case, I would recommend that she hire an immigration attorney to go over all of the facts and details of her case and attend the interview with her.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 07 Nov 2015
Topic: Got my GC - Few Parting Thoughts

I am actually ROW, so I didn't "cut" any line, nor would there be any benefit of porting to EB2 in my case...my date has been current for a year and is not expected to retrogress. My PERM wasn't even looked at for 2 years due to a completely random audit. My I-140 took nearly 8 months due to a USCIS backlog. Now, despite my date being current the whole time, my I-485 has been pending for a year, because after sitting with TSC collecting dust for more than 6 months before TSC even got to it, it was transferred to the local office for an interview which ended up just being a 5-minute session of re-answering the same questions in the I-485 form itself under oath, they didn't check my documents or ask for anything. The interview was months ago and my application is apparently sitting on somebody's desk here in the local office collecting dust. I could do what others have and start e-mailing my congressman's staffers, or opening SR after SR, or waste half a day at an Infopass appointment for them to tell me nothing. But if you put yourself in the adjudicating officer's shoes, how much of a hurry are you going to be in to adjudicate a case for somebody who is continuously pestering you when you have 300 other cases on your desk? :)
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 06 Nov 2015
Topic: Got my GC - Few Parting Thoughts

Good post, this is always good advice. After trolling these forums for years, and seeing the kind of dirty laundry people air on here, the only thing I would add is for folks to stop blaming the system and hanging onto the misconception that the system owes them something. You were not born here, and you are not a citizen. The U.S. government and its agencies don't owe you anything. Your being here is a privilege, not a right. So rather than griping about wait times, which in most cases are no fault of the agencies and simply boil down to unreasonable demand from certain countries, be grateful that you are here and have the opportunity to live and work in this country. There is abuse in all visa categories, and the blame game between EB1C-EB2, EB2-EB3, I/P-ROW, etc. really needs to stop, spillover is nothing anybody should ever expect or rely on. The agencies are doing you a huge favor in spilling over unused visas from other categories to help you cope with your demand, but you need to remember that it is just that, a favor, and nothing they are required to do. Nothing happens in a hurry when dealing with the U.S. government, so if you cannot learn to curb your emotions, particularly anger and anxiety, you are going to have a long struggle ahead of you.
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Posted in H-1B Forum on 05 Nov 2015
Topic: H1b extension processing time - Vermont

My RD is June 1st for extension based on approved I-140, regular processing, and got the approval text/mail this afternoon.

Was kind of moot in my case however, as I am ROW with I-485 pending since January and have EAD/AP, and my AOS should be approved any day now.
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Posted in I-140 Forum on 31 Oct 2015
Topic: employer H1b revoked plzz give suggestions

You don't even have to wait for the receipt notice, you just need the USPS/FedEx delivery confirmation of the I-129 H-1B transfer petition and you're good. Many people make the mistake of thinking that since they worked for the employer for a while, the employer won't revoke their visa if they resign and they won't have any timing issues as long as they have a new job lined up. This is a misconception, as employers are rarely happy when you resign unless they were about to lay you off anyway. Even if you have a very good working relationship with your supervisor and executives, you will see a new side of the employer when you tell them you're leaving against their wishes, especially if you leave in the middle of a critical project for a below-market rate with a hefty margin.

As long as your transfer is in motion, the worst thing that can happen is that the company doesn't let you put in 2 week's notice and terminates you immediately, in which case you may be out of work for a few weeks until the xfer is approved and your new job begins. Make sure you get contact info for all of your colleagues though, because if you want to use that work experience as part of a future I-140, you need somebody in the company (preferably a supervisor) to write up an experience letter for you at some point.
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Posted in I-140 Forum on 31 Oct 2015
Topic: employer H1b revoked plzz give suggestions

This is why you never put in 2 week's notice with your prior employer without first waiting until you have the USPS/Courtier delivery confirmation in hand for the H-1B transfer. While some vendors will not notify USCIS, they are procedurally required to notify USCIS immediately if the employment terminates with the sponsoring employer.

I would recommend either vacating the country immediately or immediately file for a B2 visa before you do anything, because you are now accruing unlawful presence. Any unlawful presence will be very problematic if you ever want to adjust your status via I-485 at a later time. Then, you can talk to a lawyer about your options. As long as your I-140 is still valid and that, too, hasn't been revoked, then you should be able to come back under a new, cap-exempt filing, but it depends on the other details and merits of your case.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 28 Oct 2015
Topic: My Situation is Helpless and Frustration with Oct VB1

Putting the merits of your complaint aside, why do you feel helpless and frustrated? That is not healthy. Live for today and stay in the now, you can't change the past nor predict the future. In the words of Albert Ellis, nothing is helpless or hopeless. It may not be the way that you want it to be, but it is never hopeless. When dealing with the U.S. government (for anything from Immigration to Social Security), they will make you hurry up and wait. So don't stress it, just be happy and go on living your life. Anxiety and depression will cause far more problems to your physical and psychological health than USCIS will.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 27 Oct 2015
Topic: My Situation is Helpless and Frustration with Oct VB1

You'll get GC before you retire (assuming you can hold a job for that long), but it will be a very, very long wait, so you need to ask yourself whether or not it is worth it. The inventory data shouldn't come as a galloping surprise to anybody, it is amazing they have been able to even keep up with it to that extent given the massive amounts of Indian nationals filing for AOS every time they budge the dates forward even by a few months. The situation (from a demand perspective) will not get better any time soon. H-1B workers are still coming from India at the same rate, and nearly 100% of them are still filing for green card through body shops because they never want to go back once they're here. They can either keep the priority dates back 10 years to prevent people from filing until they are caught up with processing, or they can move dates forward and end up with a massive pile of un-adjudicated (pending) I-485's. That is why I don't understand why everybody cries and lobbies to move dates forward, it really doesn't accomplish anything in terms if India's supply/demand problem aside from shifting the burden of pending applications from one agency to another. EAD might make it easier to switch jobs, but it still doesn't solve any of your problems in terms of settling in the USA, because the instability is still there....if your 485 is denied, your EAD is immediately void, which forces most people to maintain their H-1B in parallel.

Buying a house is not an issue, anybody can own property in the USA. As long as you are not upside-down on your mortgage, you can sell it at any time to wash your hands of it, even if you have no equity. So I wouldn't tie a home-buying decision in with getting a green card. Many folks from all over the world own property here without even living here for 50% of the time, especially in places like Florida where Canadian snowbirds go for the winter.

You really can't start a business on H-1B, unless you want to be a 100% investor and have others work for you, but it is very convoluted to structure in a way that you're not violating any immigration laws. I wouldn't risk it, because anything shady-looking on your tax returns can make your I-485 get a lot more scrutiny. All of these problems "come to you" because you came to the USA at the tail end of many, many years of vendors and Indian nationals heavily abusing the green card process, now your facing the consequences of the actions of those that came before you. It's nothing personal.
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Posted in I-140 Forum on 23 Oct 2015
Topic: Baccalaureate Degree evidence

If you're not a member of a professional association, then you'd fall in the "skilled worker" bucket and you don't need evidence to show membership in such an organization. In that case your labor certification contains the job requirements, and what you have to show with I-140 is that you possess the education, training, and experience requirements of the job that was advertised in the labor certification. So if the job advertised as requiring a minimum of a bachelor's degree, you'd have to provide a copy of your degree, transcripts, and if the degree is from a foreign institution, a course-by-course evaluation from a firm like ECE to determine its US equivalency. You cannot use any experience gained with your current employer, and you need to submit detailed experience letters from your prior employers as evidence of your experience. The letters must have a point of contact (preferably your supervisor) and be on the company's letterheads. You file the original, certified copy of the labor certification with the I-140 petition, and that is the evidence of the educational requirements.

Is your labor cleared yet? I would think it would be difficult to get a labor certification for something like a web developer, as there are many US citizen web developers out there willing and available to work. If yours hasn't been approved yet, my guess is that you get an audit and they may do a supervised recruitment.
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Posted in I-140 Forum on 22 Oct 2015
Topic: Baccalaureate Degree evidence

Your employer needs to file the I-140 on your behalf, so you don't need to worry about it. Their HR department and law firm will put all of that together. The specifics will vary depending on your job function, for "skilled worker" or "professional with advanced degree" categories you wouldn't need such evidence. For "professionals" category, it would be a letter from the respective professional organization stating the requirement of a baccalaureate degree for admission into the profession. If your not a member of such a specific professional organization, you are in the "skilled worker" category.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 22 Oct 2015
Topic: Any benefits to stay on TN status after EAD/AP is approved?

I've never had any problems nor been told by any lawyers that I need to leave the day of layoff, and I've had 2-month gaps between jobs. For short visits you don't need a B2 to be in the US. I know many guys I went to college with that were in the US for 4-5 months after they were laid off under their existing TN-1 while they looked for a new job. They had no issues with getting a new TN-1 or subsequently adjusting status at a later time. The only caveat is that once your job is gone, if you cross the border, you surrender your I-94 at the border and will not be able to re-enter under the same TN-1 status, you'd be considered a tourist at that point. So you have to make sure you have no travel plans until you find a new job. Which usually isn't an issue since to qualify for a TN-1 to begin with, you probably have some sort of skills that are high enough in demand that you can get on another contract within a few weeks.

But yes, if you anticipate being out of work for an extended period of time, you should definitely try to file for a B2 like the snowbirds do to avoid scrutiny with your I-485 down the line.
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Posted in I-485 Forum on 22 Oct 2015
Topic: Any benefits to stay on TN status after EAD/AP is approved?

If you were laid off prior to the 180 days, it would depend on how much notice the employer gives on layoff and whether or not they are willing to delay revoking your I-140 until after you cross the 180 days and can use AC21 to port the AOS into another company with similar job title. Some employers will keep your I-140 valid so you can xfer, as the layoff is not your fault and they are usually not out to screw you on your immigration matters. However, if your I-485 were to later get an RFE, you'd be out of luck, because they may ask for an employment verification letter. Since the employer is no longer offering you future employment, they would not be willing or able to provide you with such a letter and the AOS would be denied. If you know for sure they will withdraw your I-140 prior to the 180 day rule, you'd want to, as you pointed out, withdraw your I-485 to vacate the immigrant intent while you look for another job. Once you find one, and get the letter from USCIS stating your I-485 has been revoked, you can travel back to port of entry with that documentation and the new offer letter and get a new TN-1 visa for the new job. Just keep in mind that they do get cranky after a while if you keep renewing TN-1 status. Even though there is technically no limit to the number of extensions, I had problems after trying to extend mine a 3rd time, and they almost denied mine the 4th time. But again, this was back when they were only good for 1yr increments, and its less of an issue now that they grant them for 3 years.

This is where us Canadians have a lot more flexibility in this arena, as we can be in the country for months at a time without even having a visa. We don't have to worry about gap-related issues like our less-fortunate colleagues from India do. For people from other countries, if they have a gap in employment with no paystubs, their H-1B transfers can get denied, they can be put in removal proceedings, and it causes a lot of issues for their subsequent I-485 filings. Essentially, once they stop getting paid, they are technically out of status and are supposed to leave the country immediately. I have heard of more than one case of their I-485's being denied due to a small (3-4 month) gap in employment from several years prior, even though their subsequent H-1B transfers were approved without issue. That is why most of them are stuck working for body shops, as the consulting companies are willing to "bench" them and keep paying their prevailing wage while they are between clients to keep their H-1B valid. I don't know why they even bother still coming anymore, as many other countries can offer a comparable way of life without having to waste half of their adult lives waiting for residency.
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